Confusing facts and opinions

It is not things that disturb us, but our interpretation of their significance. Epictetus 55 – 135 A.D. Often, changes happen in our lives. When these events occur, too many of us automatically assume that a specific outcome is bound to follow. In essence, we give our opinions the weight of fact, thereby influencing the subsequent events. Consider an example. A person loses his job. As a result, he assumes that he faces financial ruin. Financial calamity isn’t yet a fact; it’s an opinion. It is one interpretation of the consequences of a factual event. But when we give our …
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Want to improve your luck?

I’m a great believer in luck, and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it. Thomas Jefferson 1746 – 1826 I’ve always believed that luck was totally random, not something you could control. But it seems I was wrong. Professor Richard Wiseman of the University of Hertfordshire has devoted a lot of time and effort to studying luck and sheds some light on how to improve your luck. As part of his studies, he placed ads in newspapers in the major cities of England asking people who considered themselves consistently lucky or unlucky to contact him. …
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Are you a risk taker?

Iron rusts from disuse; stagnant water loses its purity and in cold weather becomes frozen; even so does inaction sap the vigor of the mind. Leonardo da Vinci 1452 – 1519 How would you answer the question, “Are you a risk taker?” If you’re like most people, you probably want some clarification as to the nature of the risk: putting money in the stock market; investing in a business; changing jobs or even professions; moving to a different part of the country; or something else entirely. All of those actions could be considered high risk; it all depends on how …
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