The frog and the scorpion

Trying to control or change what we can’t only results in torment. Epictetus 55 – 135 A.D. There’s an old parable about a frog and a scorpion that provides a valuable lesson. As the story goes, the scorpion wanted to get across a lake. Because scorpions can’t swim, it asked a frog to transport it. The frog refused, saying, “You’re a scorpion; if I allow you on my back, surely you’ll sting me and I’ll die.” The scorpion replied, “Why would I sting you? I can’t swim, so I’d be foolish to sting you. It would mean my death too.” …
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The Hare and the Tortoise

Whether you think you can or whether you think you can’t, you’re probably right. Henry Ford 1863 – 1947 Like most children, I heard Aesop’s Fable about the Tortoise and the Hare when I was growing up. The thing I remember most about the story was the moral: “Slow and steady wins the race.” But there’s an equally important lesson that I hadn’t recognized until I recently read the fable again. For your benefit, here’s the story; see if you can spot the lesson I’d failed to grasp all these years. A Hare one day ridiculed the short feet and …
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Expectations are premeditated resentments

By Diana Bletter Don’t you love knock-knock jokes? Here’s one: “Knock, knock!” “Who’s there?” “Banana.” “Banana who?” “Knock, knock!” “Who’s there?” “Banana.” “Banana who?” “Knock, knock!” “Who’s there?” “Orange.” “Orange who?” “Orange you glad I didn’t say banana?” Kids love that joke. It can also teach us something about ourselves, too. How often do we hear the knock on the door and expect people to be different than they usually are? I was talking to one of my daughters, Amalia, about her friend — I’ll call him Chuck — who is always late. Amalia says that she makes plans with …
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