Winning by inches

If you celebrate the small victories, you will eventually win the war. Ian K. Smith 1969 – I’ve noticed a certain preference in our culture for fast, dramatic accomplishments: the winning lottery ticket, the Grand Slam home run, the Hail Mary touchdown, the runaway bestseller. We’re drawn to the opportunity for an immediate win, for reaching our goals in one fell swoop. These achievements might appear to be worth chasing — after all, who wouldn’t want a big victory in a short time frame? But what do we lose when we always swing for the fences? For a start, there’s a reason why …
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Running to stand still

Nothing recedes like progress. E. E. Cummings 1894 – 1962 Have you ever observed someone running on a treadmill? Usually, they’re putting forth a good deal of effort, yet they aren’t physically going anywhere; they continue to stay in the exact same place as when they started their workout. For me, this image provides a good analogy for the way so many people live their day-to-day lives: they’re constantly expending effort — possibly a great amount of effort — but they don’t make any forward progress. To some extent, stagnant progress is inevitable, because there will always be setbacks in life: the …
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Been there, done that

One never notices what has been done; one can only see what remains to be done. Marie Curie 1867 – 1934 Many of you have probably heard of a “honey do” jar or a job jar: a container stuffed with slips of paper listing all the little things that need to be done around the home. That way, whenever you have spare time, you don’t have to remember the different items that need maintenance or repair — you can just pull a slip from the jar and get started on a chore. Unfortunately, the problem with a job jar is that it always …
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